Barrowbridge

Barrowbridge has a great deal of history attached to it, for it was here in the Dark Ages that an unknown king took shelter to plan his battle with the Vikings, who were later defeated. In thankfulness for this victory he built an abbey on rising ground, as most of the land on the level was a swamp. No trace of the abbey has been found in recent years apart from stones brought to the surface when ploughing, also some bits of tiles. A short distance away is another church built on a hill, known locally as the ‘Tump’. It may have guarded this ancient kings camp. The church is dedicated to St Michael and during excavations in 1703 the skeleton of a young man was found with a bullet in his shoulder — he may have been killed fighting in the battle for Langford in 1645.

Most of the houses are built on the river bank as materials are available from the brickyards in Sedgemouth and are brought up the river by barge. The river dominates the village as it has one of the few bridges that can support the width and weight of a heavily loaded waggon. It contains only one inn which is conveniently located next to the crossing. Barrowbridge also has an annual fair which is held in the yard of the Bridge Inn, next to Greengables the vicarage — it consists of one stall loaded up with sweets of every description and bag upon bag of locally made sweetbread.

Every villager works hard – either managing willows or keeping a few cows and the usual pig for winter meat, as well as a few fowls. Everyone makes cider from the few apple trees on most properties so one always has some visitors. Some of the cows graze on the river bank of the Withy as there is always plenty of grass.

Barrowbridge

Pandaemonium Neopagan